Poor Genetics And Weak Nerves

Dear Mr. Katz:

I recently purchased your book, “Secrets of a Professional Dog Trainer!” and have tried very hard to curb my dog Honey’s aggressions, which I have now recognized as both fear and food aggression… after reading your book.

But instead of better, I fear it is getting worse.

We adopted her from the age of 2-3 months, and she was fine in the beginning. Very loving and extremely hyperactive. The hyperactivity continues, and she still jumps up at anyone coming near the house. She seems to fear tall men, especially if they have anything in their hands, like a garden rake or spade, and she backs away from strangers, even small children. She is afraid. She gets aggressive with anyone she senses is afraid of dogs, and she has gone for them, making it worse for them, of course! She becomes aggressive with anyone who passes her by when any food is around, and she will growl and snarl at them, telling them in effect that the food is hers, so hands off!

To crown it all off, she snarled and growled at me today when I went up to stroke her, which she has not done before. I have always tried to correct her, either by the leash, or we have a muzzle which we correct her with, and failing that, I will put her in her crate as a punishment. I am not a novice with a dog. Before Honey, we had the most wonderful shepherd/husky dog, who was similarly abandoned, and I never had one problem with him – he was wonderful. I have taken honey to obedience classes – She does sit and stay, also goes down when she is instructed to.

I feel that I have done everything possible to alleviate her aggression, but it doesn’t seem to work. I have two daughters who both pour love on her too, and quite frankly, I am afraid one day that she will become vicious – Can you please give me some advice, because I do not want to have to have her put down.

I have tried everything you recommend in your book, including spitting in her food, and making her wait to eat last. But I must be doing something wrong! I know mixed breeds aren’t your favorite, but please make an exception in my case. I love dogs, and hate to be beaten. I am also English, and you must know that we are softies when it comes to animals!

I await your reply in haste!

Sincerely,

Diana

Dear Diana,

First, let me point out that I share my home with a mixed breed.

And yes… I like him. A whole lot! His name is Forbes and he is one of the most compatible dogs I’ve ever had the pleasure of sharing my life with.

To be honest, I have a feeling that your dog’s issues are very much a result of poor genetics and weak nerves.

But before jumping to any conclusions, you must first recognize that all of the information you’ve droned on about provides me with NONE of the information I need in order to help you.

deoxyribonucleic-acid-1500076_640So… what do I need? I need to know what happens when you correct the dog? Does she continue to act aggressive? Does she stop immediately? Does she try to bite you? Does she go submissive? And once you get her to pay attention to you, what’s happened once you’ve started to create new/positive associations with the stimulus, as described in the book?

These are all of the questions you need to be asking yourself. As well as:

– Is my timing on the money? Is the dog associating my corrections with the behavior (the aggression).

– Am I being consistent? (Be honest… if the dog isn’t getting a firm correction EVERY TIME she exhibits the behavior, then it’s no wonder that you’re not getting the results you seek.)

– Are my corrections motivational? If the distraction/stimulus is more motivational than your correction, then you’ll never get any results. You’ll know that your correction is motivational when the dog stops looking at the stimulus and starts looking at you.

Please let me know. However, judging on what you’ve described I would not be surprised if this is mostly the results of poor genetics and weak nerves. And in which case, you will never be able to overcome the dog’s genetics, so the dog should either be put to sleep or confined to such a lifestyle that she only comes in contact with you and people that she does not show the aggression towards. But before you make any snap decisions I would recommend consulting with a professional who can evaluate the dog for you. It’s impossible to give an accurate assessment without seeing the mutt. Err… dog.

That’s all for now, folks!

Craft Guidelines For The Grandma

To get started we can begin with crochet abbreviations to help you relate to the process. Crochet experts use the terms beg (Beginning) bet (Between), bk lp (Back loop) ch (chain), ch-(previous chain), cont (Continue), dc (double crochet), dec (decreasing), dtr (double/triple crochet), ft lp (Front loop), hdc (half-double crochet), inc (Increasing), lp (loops), and so on.

Those who crochet must learn how to handle the hook, work jointly, chain stitch, slip knot, and crochet a single row.

How to hook:

To hold your hook you would start with a pencil. The hook may have a resting finger, which you can locate your thumbs to gain control.

How to work in union:

Once you have a hold on your hook, weave the thread/yarn so that your, left fingers have control, and can be used to apply pressure. Once you begin your project (Work), you want to use your thumb and the center left finger to press the stitches.

How to slip knot:

You want to form a shape-like pretzel by looping your yarn about, allow the loose ends to drop, fallen behind your loop. Pull the ends of your yarn without pulling too tight.

How to chain stitch:

On your hook position a slipknot and use your hands, i.e. center left finger and the thumb to hold the yarn in place. Wrap your yarn first up and then over your hook starting at the back and moving to the front. You will need to familiarize your self with this procedure, since it is a basic crocheting technique known as “Yarn over Yo.”

Now pull the yearn using your hook bringing it through the lp (loop). When you yarn over Yo and combine it with lp, it forms a ch. (Chain)

Continue until you have the acceptable chain and continue motion on even strokes and until the stitches that form a chain and each stitch (st(s) are even. Near your work area, hold your chain and continue twisting whilst avoiding counting the loops on your hook.

How to crochet a single line:

Beneath your crown loops insert your hook at the second chain away from your hook and begin Yarn over Yo crocheting. You should continue to stitch between the two loops. Continue the yarn over process and pull your yarn through the chain to it meets two loops on your hook. Continue the Yo process again and pull the yarn through the other two loops.

Once you complete your hook, work, slipknots, chain stitch, single line, etc, you will need to learn how to double crochet, half-double, triple; slip stitch, back loop, popcorn stitch, etc. Behind the steps is the process of working back loops, chain space, stitches between, and about the post.

How to double stitch:

yarn-1615524_640To double crochet you will need to perform the yarn over Yo steps and then insert your hook into the third chain away from the Yo and hook. Next, pull your yarn so that it goes through your chain and three loops at the hook. Continue the Yarn over steps and pull the yarn through the next two loops. Again, continue the Yarn over and pull the yarn through the remaining two loops.

How to half double:

Conduct the yarn over steps and insert your hook so that it goes into the second chain away from your hook. Yarn over and string your yarn through the third loops.

How to triple crochet:

Yarn over a couple of times and insert your hook so that it goes into the fourth chain away from the hook. Yarn over and stretch your yarn through the chain and the fourth loop at your hook. Yarn over, stretch the yarn through the second loops at the hook, and finish your three time steps.